JAMES A. MUNRO – Migratory Bird Officer

When Great Britain ( on behalf of Canada) signed the Migratory Birds Convention with the United States in 1916, both parties hoped to end market hunting and embark on a broad policy of “insuring the preservation of such migratory birds as are either useful to man or are harmless.” The subsequent endorsement of the convention by the parliament of Canada created the need for an enforcement agency with a strong scientific base. Today we know that agency as the Canadian Wildlife Service, but it was originally called the Migratory Birds Protection Office – a unit of the National Parks Service, headed by J.B. Harkin.

In 1920 James A. Munro was appointed as sole Migratory Bird Officer for the 4 western provinces. The addition of J. Dewey Soper in 1928, and Robie Tufts in 1933, allowed the division of the country into regions, and Munro was able to concentrate on British Columbia until his retirement in 1949. The decision to devote a large portion of the Migratory Bird Office’s resources to British Columbia reflects the widespread unpopularity of the the above mentioned legislation. It was not approved by the provincial government until special privileges, particularly the spring hunting of Brant, were guaranteed.

When Great Britain ( on behalf of Canada) signed the Migratory Birds Convention with the United States in 1916, both parties hoped to end market hunting and embark on a broad policy of “insuring the preservation of such migratory birds as are either useful to man or are harmless.” The subsequent endorsement of the convention by the parliament of Canada created the need for an enforcement agency with a strong scientific base. Today we know that agency as the Canadian Wildlife Service, but it was originally called the Migratory Birds Protection Office – a unit of the National Parks Service, headed by J.B. Harkin.

In 1920 James A. Munro was appointed as sole Migratory Bird Officer for the 4 western provinces. The addition of J. Dewey Soper in 1928, and Robie Tufts in 1933, allowed the division of the country into regions, and Munro was able to concentrate on British Columbia until his retirement in 1949. The decision to devote a large portion of the Migratory Bird Office’s resources to British Columbia reflects the widespread unpopularity of the the above mentioned legislation. It was not approved by the provincial government until special privileges, particularly the spring hunting of Brant, were guaranteed.

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